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Why Smoke Herbs?

The following is an excerpt from our zine, Puff Into The Present Moment:

Why Smoke Herbs?

Working with herbs through smoke has a couple of unique advantages over other herbal preparations, especially when it comes to easing symptoms of [stress]: 

The effects are almost immediate.

Many of the effects that herbs have on us when digested also take place when smoked, except when smoked the effects are practically instantaneous. This is because some plant constituents are what we could call fire-soluble or smoke-soluble. These are going to be your volatile oils (like terpenes), alkaloids (such as nicotine), THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids, plant sterols, acids, pigment compounds, etc. When you smoke herbs, the smoke entering your lungs is carrying with it these constituents, and these constituents are entering your bloodstream right away.

Unlike working with orally-ingested herbal preparations like capsules or teas that have to first go through your digestive system in order to get into your blood, smoke bypasses that first step and goes right for the blood. That blood is then pumped by the heart up to your brain. This all happens very quickly, which is why you can usually begin to feel the effects of your smoke by the time you exhale your first puff. 

Instant effect means instant relief.

Since the effects of your herbs will be felt almost instantly when smoked, this means you’ll feel their support almost instantly as well. And who wouldn’t want to stop [stress] in its tracks? This rapid onset of effects is perfect for when you start feeling overwhelmed and want to take things down a notch. 

All of this isn't to say that smoking is the BEST way to work with herbs, because it's not. But it does offer us fast-acting support that is especially effective in easing [stress].

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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